In Indiana, for a Republican or Democratic candidate’s name to appear on the ballot for a state or federal office, including US President, that candidate must submit 4500 certified signatures of registered voters. Five hundred signatures must come from each of Indiana’s nine congressional districts.

By contrast, for an independent or minor party candidate’s name to appear on Indiana’s ballot for a state or federal office, including US President, that candidate must submit 32,741 certified signatures of registered voters. For their names to appear on the ballot, citizens wishing to serve in office as an independent or “minor” party candidate are subjected to a standard that is 700% higher than for Democratic and Republican candidates. Thus, the Democratic and Republican parties ensure their “major” party status by severely restricting access to voters, the ballot and any federal matching campaign funds for independent and “minor” party candidates.

Taking this newly-discovered information to the voters is my mission as I gather signatures for another candidate for state-wide office. As I ask voters for their signatures to get this person’s name on the ballot, I inform them of the disparity for ballot access created by the Republican and Democratic parties. Forty five hundred versus 32,000. The response has been near-universal shock and a readiness to sign the candidate’s ballot-access petition form. I intend to film my interactions with voters and their reactions to Indiana’s unfair ballot access laws.  This will be used to produce a Youtube video on this subject. Look for it here and on a web portal under construction by the local Green Party.

 

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